Title TK

religiousragings:

A man who can save himself but chooses to die anyway is making a noble sacrifice if he knows that by doing so he can save millions.
A man does the same thing, knowing that he’s gonna go through some pain for a bit, but then knowing he’s going to come back to life and then be ascending to heaven to sit at God’s right hand, ruling over all of humanity, is just wading through a bit of shit to retrieve the golden egg.
I mean, forget the saving millions part.  I’d do it just for the payment afterward.
The resurrection and ascension totally destroy the significance of the death,  Even if one could call it a sacrifice, it can be seen as a sacrifice for personal gain.  Saving humanity was just gravy.
~ Steve

If I remember right, Jesus didn’t actually know what would happen, thus the “God why have you forsaken me” bit on the cross. So the resurrection crap was just a bonus. (And for the record, I’m an atheist, so I say this not from a place of religious defensiveness but from a place of overinvestment in narrative consistency.)

religiousragings:

A man who can save himself but chooses to die anyway is making a noble sacrifice if he knows that by doing so he can save millions.

A man does the same thing, knowing that he’s gonna go through some pain for a bit, but then knowing he’s going to come back to life and then be ascending to heaven to sit at God’s right hand, ruling over all of humanity, is just wading through a bit of shit to retrieve the golden egg.

I mean, forget the saving millions part.  I’d do it just for the payment afterward.

The resurrection and ascension totally destroy the significance of the death,  Even if one could call it a sacrifice, it can be seen as a sacrifice for personal gain.  Saving humanity was just gravy.

~ Steve

If I remember right, Jesus didn’t actually know what would happen, thus the “God why have you forsaken me” bit on the cross. So the resurrection crap was just a bonus. (And for the record, I’m an atheist, so I say this not from a place of religious defensiveness but from a place of overinvestment in narrative consistency.)

(Source: jesusislove, via uprootedandrunning)

madnessbeckons:

My favorite Atheist 

always
reblog
lovecraft

madnessbeckons:

My favorite Atheist 

always

reblog

lovecraft

(via feistyfeminist)

This series is severely flawed. Holly Hunter is an amazing actress, and she convinces me that she IS Grace Hanadarko. It is, however, Grace Hanadarko who makes this such a lousy story line. Picture, if you possibly can, an Angel who looks, talks, and probably smells like Bubba, your stereotypical Good-Old-Boy. He is concerned that Grace is not living correctly and that she has to change her life. But aside from telling her this, and that never very strongly, he gives her no direction, and doesn’t even help her to set a different direction for herself. He also has no concern for religion of any type or flavor, considering all of them as equally acceptable paths. This is a horribly insane point of view. Then there’s Grace herself, an out-and-out atheist who accepts Earl as a genuine angel, but still denies God. She has absolutely no self-respect and has sex with anyone who has a dingus. The problem with this is that women who actually act like this are acting in opposition to a woman’s nature and are not generally good at it, or anything else. Yet Grace is a superior homicide detective. Add to this the fact that Grace makes no progress toward salvation, so how effective can Earl be? I have canceled my order for the remainder of Season 1 and all of season 2. I cannot see myself being entertained by such an egregiously false premise.

A Netflix review of the TV show Saving Grace, written by one “Uncle Dickie,” who, I am horrified to see, is “69% similar” to me.

(For the record, I’m really enjoying the show.  A foul-mouthed Holly Hunter gets her swerve on [in all senses] and hangs out with an awesome dog.  What more could you want?)

Cute animals. Profanity. Literary nerditude. Rainbows. Legless dogs. Attempts to be a less clueless person.
"Cento" Copyright © Andrew Brinker 2011.